Week 19- Winter Squash Guide

As we progress through the growing season, generous eaters have opened their minds and their kitchens to new foods or different, colorful varieties. Winter squash is the queen of the season, offering a great diversity of shapes and colors. We hope you eaters  can find the guide below useful in, first of all, determining which variety of squash you have received, and how to cook it to bring out the best flavor. Please note that winter squash will keep for several months in a dry, cool, well-ventilated place. They will also continue to ripen as you store them.

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Carnival (Acorn Group): moist, yellow flesh. Bake open with flavorings inside, or scoop out to season later.

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Green Acorn: moist, yellow flesh. Bake open with flavorings inside, or scoop out to season later.

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Spaghetti squash: nearly a summer squash, doesn’t keep quite as long as some others. bake open to achieve the moisture loss necessary for the stringy ‘spaghetti’ texture.

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Buttercup (Kabocha Group): creamy, yellow-orange flesh. Make a pie with it and no one will know it’s not pumpkin!

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Sunshine (Kabocha): best cooked covered, trapping steam or whole- with vents punctured. Dry flesh doesn’t lend to puree, but will ‘dice’ better than a buttercup.

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Long Pie Pumpkin: ready and ripe when skin turns mostly or completely orange. It’s a long keeper, and has the best texture and flavor of any pumpkin we’ve tried- hands down!

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Pie Pumpkin: moist and creamy, and not just for pies. Try a pumpkin lasagne, pumpkin stuffed ravioli, or just eat it like any other squash!

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Cinderella- Heirloom Pumpkin: Gorgeous to display, and makes a fine soup! (Doesn’t keep as long as some other varieties.)

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Blue Hubbard: “close you eyes … and you would think you were eating cake.” 1918 Gregory Catalog.

(2016- This year, the “baby” blue hubbards reached a more-manageable size in comparison to the 40+ pounders picked a couple years ago. The flesh is orange, and make fabulous pancakes. Cook it, puree, then freeze the extra for the coming months! TIP: FREEZE IN KNOWN QUANTITIES THAT FIT YOUR FAVORITE RECIPE. )

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